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Motor Wiring Examples

The following table summarizes the currently released stepper motor control product key capabilities when using our non-current-controlled models.  Note that the double current mode (using a single motor) is only available using firmware version 1.59 or later.   You will want to review the calculating motor current faq in order to determine the current requirements for your motor.

Product Unipolar Bipolar Current/Winding with 2 motors Current/Winding with 1 motor Motor Voltages
SS1010 x   0.5 to 1 Amp 1.0 Amp 7-26
BS1010 x x 1.0 Amp 2.0 Amp 5-34

The following table summarizes the currently released stepper motor control product key capabilities when using our current-controlled models.   These products require only that you select a power supply whose voltage and current can handle your stepper motor.   You will first want to review the calculating motor current for current controlled products faq in order to determine the current and voltage requirements for your motor.

Product Unipolar Bipolar Maximum Number of Motors Current/ Winding, each motor Motor Voltages
BC2D20   x 2 0.2-1.5 Amp up to 34
BC4E20   x 4 0.2-1.5 Amp up to 34

The systems have been tested with an interesting mix of stepper motors, both unipolar and bipolar. All were purchased from Jameco (www.jameco.com). The following sections summarize some of the motors tested.

The wiring diagrams and tables shown are identical for the BS1010 and SS1010.

The motors covered by this document are as follows: note that there are more details available for these and other motors in the manuals relating to the particular controller.

Unipolar Motors Bipolar Motors

Unipolar Motors

This section shows some unipolar motors which were used.   Most work on any of the boards currently available from our company. In each case, the wiring is:


Jameco 105873 12 Volt, 0.150 Amp/winding, 3.6 deg/step

This Howard Industries stepping motor has a manufacturing part number of 1-19-4202. It is wired as:

Color

BiStepA06, BiStep2A, SimStepA04 or SS0705

BiStepA04

Black

1

5

Brown

2

1

Red

3

2

Green

4

3

White

5

4

<no connection>

6

 


Jameco 151861 5 Volt, 0.55 Amp/winding, 7.5 deg/step

This Airpax motor has a manufacturing part number of C42M048A04.  As with the other Airpax motor, it does not microstep at all. Mode "3o" can smooth its actions, but it does not "stop" at any other points than ½ step locations. It is wired as:

Color

BiStepA06 or BiStep2A

Green

1

Black

2

Brown

3

Yellow

4

Orange

5

Red

6

When using a 5 volt motor (such as this), you may use a single, 7.5 volt power supply (this may slightly over-voltage the motor), or you may use a split supply. In this case, use a 7.5-12 volt supply for the power to the digital electronics (pins 1 and 4 on the power connector), and a 6 to 7 volt power supply for the motor (pins 2 and 3 on the power connector). The TI driver chips being used drop 1.1 to 2 volts (depending on the chip and the temperature); accordingly, cooling the board becomes quite important, in order to have stable drive voltages for the motor.


Jameco 155432 12 Volt, 0.4 Amp/winding, 2000 g-cm, 1.8 deg/step

This motor provides for 2000 g-cm of holding torque, and has a manufacturing number of GBM 42BYG228. Its wiring order is:

Color

BiStepA06, BiStep2A, SimStepA04 or SS0705

BiStepA04

White

1

5

Brown

2

1

Yellow

3

2

Red

4

3

Blue

5

4

Black

6

5


Jameco 162026 12 Volt, 0.6 Amp/winding, 6000 g-cm, 1.8 deg/step

This motor provides for 6000 g-cm(!) of holding torque, and has a manufacturing number of GBM 57BYGO84. Its wiring order is:

Color

BiStepA06, BiStep2A, SimStepA04 or SS0705

BiStepA04

Black

1

5

Orange

2

1

Green

3

2

Yellow

4

3

Blue

5

4

White

6

5


Jameco 169201 24 Volt, 0.160 Amp/winding, 1.8 deg/step

This excellent motor has a manufacturing part number of STP-57D317. It uses 6 wires, with the wiring being:

Color

BiStepA06, BiStep2A, SimStepA04 or SS0705

BiStepA04

Black (Common lead for PEACH and VIOLET)

1

5

Peach

2

1

Violet

3

2

Yellow

4

3

Red

5

4

White (Common lead for Yellow and White)

6

5


Jameco 173180 12 Volt, 0.060 Amp/winding, 0.09 deg/step geared

This tiny motor has a manufacturing part number of 30BYJ02AH, BF33. Thanks to its gearing, it claims to have both a holding and detent torque of 400 g-cm! It uses 5 wires, already in a connector which directly works with our product. However, two of the wires must be switched (i.e., the order of the wires is incorrect for our use): the pink and yellow wires need to be reversed in the connector. The correct order therefore becomes:

Color

BiStepA06, BiStep2A, SimStepA04 or SS0705

BiStepA04

Red

1

5

Orange

2

1

Pink

3

2

Yellow

4

3

Blue

5

4

<no connection>

6

5


Jameco 174553 12 Volt, 0.6 Amp/winding, 7.5 deg/step

This motor has a manufacturing part number of NMB PM55L-048-NBC7.  Its wiring is:

Color

BiStepA06 or BiStep2A

Black (common for Brown and Red)

1

Brown

2

Red

3

Green

4

Yellow

5

Orange (common for Yellow and Green)

6

 


Bipolar Motors

This section shows some bipolar motors which were used. In each case, the wiring is:


Jameco 117954 5 Volt, 0.8 Amp, 7.5 deg/step

This unit is an Airpax LB82773-M1 2 phase bipolar stepping motor. Its wiring, as it arrives, actually works (if you plug its 4-wire connector into the 4 non-ground pins on the controller).  This motor does NOT microstep at all. It may only be used in full and half step modes (i.e. use the configuration commands "0o", "1o" and "2o")! Mode "o3" may smooth its steps slightly, but it will not really stop at any other than ½ step locations.

When using a 5 volt motor (such as this), you may use a single, 7.5 volt power supply (this may slightly over-voltage the motor), or you may use a split supply. In this case, use a 7.5-12 volt supply for the power to the digital electronics (pins 1 and 4 on the power connector), and a 6 to 7 volt power supply for the motor (pins 2 and 3 on the power connector). The TI driver chips being used drop 1.1 to 2 volts (depending on the chip and the temperature); accordingly, cooling the board becomes quite important, in order to have stable drive voltages for the motor.

The wiring of this unit is therefore:

Color

BiStepA06 or BiStep2A

<no connection>

1

Yellow

2

Black

3

Red

4

Gray

5

<no connection>

6


Jameco 155459 12 Volt, 0.4 Amp, 2100 g-cm, 1.8 deg/step

This unit is a GBM 42BYG023 stepping motor, which provides for 2100 g-cm of holding torque. It may be wired as:

Color

BiStepA06 or BiStep2A

BiStepA04

<no connection>

1

 

Brown

2

1

Orange

3

2

Yellow

4

3

Red

5

4

<no connection>

6

5


Jameco 163395 8.4 Volt, 0.28 Amp, 0.9 deg/step

This is a Scotts Valley 5017-935 stepper motor. It may be wired as:

Color

BiStepA06 or BiStep2A

BiStepA04

<no connection>

1

 

Yellow

2

1

White

3

2

Blue

4

3

Red

5

4

<no connection>

6

5


Jameco 168831 12 Volt, 1.25 Amp

This motor only works with our 2 amp product, the BiStep2A in 2-motor mode, or with any of our other BiStep units in 1-motor mode. It is a Superior Electric "SLO-SYN" stepping motor, model number SM-200-0050-HL. We ordered it since it stated "1 amp"; however, it turns out to be a 1.25 amp product, and therefore will cause the one amp product (the BiStepA06) to overheat (and probably fail) after just a short period of use, if it is configured to run two of the motors at a given time. We tested it with the wiring of:

Color

BiStep2A

<no connection>

1

White/Brown

2

Brown

3

White/Yellow

4

Yellow

5

<no connection>

6

In order to operate this motor with any of our BiStep units which do not directly handle its current level, you must configure the BiStep to operate in "Single Motor Double Current" Mode.  This feature is only available with GenStepper firmware versions 1.59 and later.  To do this, you ground the "LY-" and "LY+" input signals (A0 and A1), and you connect the X and Y connectors in parallel to the motor.  That is to say, the "WA1" connection from the Y connector and the "WA1" from the X connector must both be connected to the yellow wire of the motor. 

If you fail to wire the unit correctly, you will be shorting power to ground, and are likely to burn up the board!  This is not a warranted failure!